Friendly PSA: Workout vs. Work Out

Updated: Feb 12, 2019

(and other common grammar mistakes we all make on our social media posts)



Woop woop! It's the Grammar Police! Listen, guys, I'm about to get a little... petty. But bear with me here, because I am only coming from a place of love. I promise.


There is a epidemic sweeping the nation on our social media feeds, and it's called "Posting without Proofing." Let me be the first to say that I have posted without proofing many a-time, only to notice three days later that there was a glaring and embarrassing typo that made me want to crawl in a hole and cringe all night. I am not here to judge - I get it. Autocorrect fails are real. Typing in a hurry is real. Brain fog is real. We all make mistakes. But here's why I'm writing a whole blog post about this. Grammar-shaming is also real. Whether we like it or not, people judge you based on a lot of things, and grammar is one of them. Believe it or not, I have even heard of people not taking a fitness instructor's classes based on their social media postings that were full of spelling and grammar mistakes. I know it's not right. But it's a thing.


But fear not, fellow fitness instructors! Grammar mistakes can easily be fixed, and you can avoid being a victim of grammar-shaming! Check out this list of our most frequently posted grammar mistakes.


1. Workout vs. Work Out


Example of a Not-so-Great Post:

Are you ready to workout with me tonight?

Join me at 5pm for Crazy Cardio at Fab Fitness Studio in Mapletown!


The Corrected Version of the Post:

Are you ready to work out with me tonight?

Join me at 5pm for Crazy Cardio at Fab Fitness Studio in Mapletown!


Another Correct Version of the Post:

Are you ready for tonight's Crazy Cardio workout?

Join me at 5pm at Fab Fitness Studio in Mapletown!


Do you see the slight difference? It's the matter of one little, tiny space. One simple click of the space bar.


Here's the deal:

workout (noun) : an exercise session

work out (verb) : to exercise


Believe me, I know this is not a HUGE deal, and this mistake is so common that it is possible that people won't even catch it. You can decide if it's a big deal to you.


2. Apart vs. A Part


Example of a Not-so-Great Post:

I am so happy to be apart of this awesome fitness family! You guys rocked it tonight!


The Corrected Version of this Post:

I am so happy to be a part of this awesome fitness family! You guys rocked it tonight!


Once again, the click of the space bar makes a huge difference.


Here's the deal:

apart (adverb) : separated from

a part (noun) : a piece of something, a fraction of a whole


The reason this one is a big deal is that if you're trying to say that you're happy to be a part of a fitness family, and you use "apart" instead of "a part," you are actually saying you are happy to be separated from them. Yikes! When in doubt, space bar it out!


3. Could of / Would of vs. Could Have / Would Have


Example of a Not-so-Great Post:

Sorry, fitness fam, I wish I could of made it to class tonight, but I have the flu. Hope to see you guys next week!


The Corrected Version of this Post:

Sorry, fitness fam, I wish I could have made it to class tonight, but I have the flu.

Hope to see you guys next week!


Another Correct Version of this Post:

Sorry, fitness fam, I wish I could've made it to class tonight, but I have the flu.

Hope to see you guys next week!


Here's the deal:

Plain and simple... putting "of" after "would" or "could" is never right. It's understandable why many people think "could of" or "would of" might be correct, because our brains can read "could've" to sound like "could of." But trust me on this. It is never correct. Never!


4. To vs. Too (vs. Two)


Example of a Not-so-Great Post:

OMG, to many burpees to count in class today! Great job, HIIT Crew!


The Corrected Version of this Post:

OMG, too many burpees to count in class today!

Great job, HIIT Crew!


One little letter added on to the end of the word makes a world of difference.


Here's the deal:

to (preposition) : shows direction, means "until," or indicates an infinitive

Examples:

We're going to the gym. (shows direction)

They are open from 10am to 5pm. (means "until")

We love to dance. (indicates an infinitive)


too (adverb) : means "also" or "as well" or "excessively"

Examples:

I love Step Aerobics too!

There are too many people in this room.


two (noun) : literally just the number 2


5. Your vs. You're


Example of Not-so-Great Post:

Your going to love this new playlist, Cycle Squad!


The Corrected Version of this Post:

You're going to love this new playlist, Cycle Squad!


Ack, this one is so common, I'm actually worried that in a few years, both versions will be acceptable, and I am not prepared for that. Grammarians unite! Together, we can make a change!


Here's the deal:

your (possessive adjective) : shows possession Examples:

Your leggings are so cute!

I'm coming to your kickboxing class tomorrow.


you're (contraction) : literally means "you are"

Example:

You're (you are) going to love it.

You're (you are) the best!


6. Misuse of Apostrophes


Example of Not-so-Great Post:

Whose coming out tonight? No excuse's! Its going to be epic! See you at 6pm!


The Corrected Version of this Post:

Who's coming out tonight?

No excuses! It's going to be epic!

See you at 6pm!


Somewhere along the line in our grammar education, apostrophes got confusing, and therefore, some of us like to just throw them around willy-nilly.


Here's the deal:

To make a noun plural, just add an s. No apostrophe needed! Huzzah!

Examples:

We're doing 100 burpees in class this morning.

She loves Nike shoes so much she has fifty pairs.

who's (contraction) : literally means "who is" or "who has" Examples: Who's (who is) planning on attending class tomorrow? Who's (who has) ever bought Balega socks before? Are they worth it?


whose (possessive form of who) : used to ask or tell whom something belongs to

Examples:

Whose water bottle is this? (To whom does the water bottle belong?)

Whose class are you going to take on Monday? (To whom does the class belong?)


it's (contraction) : literally means "it is" or "it has"

Examples: It's (it is) time to work out! It's (it has) been a crazy week.


its (possessive determiner) : to show possession or that something belongs to someone

Examples:

My headband lost its elasticity.

The studio has its own set of rules.


7. Lack of Punctuation and/or Capitalization


Example of Not-so-Great Post:

so good to see my rockstars come out to class today and kill it way to go guys i am really proud of you for showing up every week good job


The Corrected Version of this Post:

So good to see my rock stars come out to class today and kill it! Way to go, guys. I am really proud of you for showing up every week. Good job!


Punctuation gives your brain the breaks it needs to understand the content posted. Run-on sentences with no punctuation at all read like a crazy, breathless, sad person. I don't know about you, but I'm not a crazy, breathless, sad person, so I don't want to sound like one in my social media postings.


Bottom line...

Am I saying you have to stress out over each word you post and beat yourself up over grammar mistakes? Of course not. But putting a little time and effort into your posts will help you build a loyal following in your classes, and making sure your posts are grammatically correct definitely helps. People look to you for motivation, and I can guarantee there's a recent graduate from the Grammar Police Academy checking out what you're writing.

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